The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine
Office of Congressional and government Affairs
At A Glance
 
 
Briefing
: Managing Materials for a 21st Century Military and Minerals, Critical Minerals, and the U.S. Economy
Dates:
Wed, Oct 3, 2007   228 Russell Senate Office Bldg. – 9:00 a.m.
(Managing Materials for a 21st Century Military only.)
Thu, Oct 4, 2007   366 Dirksen Senate Office Bldg. – 11:00 a.m.
Thu, Oct 4, 2007   1324 Longworth House Office Bldg. – 2:00 p.m.
THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES
National Research Council
Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences
National Materials Advisory Board
Committee on Assessing the Need for a Defense Stockpile
 
And
 
Division on Earth and Life Studies
Board on Earth Sciences and Resources
Committee on Critical Mineral Impacts on the U.S. Economy
 
*****
 
Congressional Briefings
Wednesday, October 3, 2007
228 Russell Senate Office Bldg. – 9:00 a.m.
(Managing Materials for a 21st Century Military only.)
 
and
 
Thursday, October 4, 2007
366 Dirksen Senate Office Bldg. – 11:00 a.m.
and
1324 Longworth House Office Bldg. – 2:00 p.m.
(Both reports)
 
*****
 
on
 
Managing Materials for a 21st Century Military
 
And
 
Minerals, Critical Minerals, and the U.S. Economy
 
 
by
 
 
Robert H. Latiff, Vice President, Chief Engineer and Technology Officer, SAIC’s Space and Geospatial Intelligence Business Unit, and USAF Major General (Retired); and Chair, Committee on Assessing the Need for a Defense Stockpile, National Research Council
 
J. Patrick Looney, Assistant Laboratory Director, Policy and Strategic Planning, Brookhaven National Laboratory; and Member, Committee on Assessing the Need for a Defense Stockpile, National Research Council
 
And
 
Rodderick G. Eggert, Professor and Director, Division of Economics and Business, Colorado School of Mines, and Chair, Committee on Critical Mineral Impacts on the U.S. Economy, National Research Council
 
Stephen W. Freiman, Freiman Consulting, Inc.; and Member, Committee on Critical Mineral Impacts on the U.S. Economy, National Research Council
 
Mary M. Poulton, Professor and Department Head, Department of Mining and Geological Engineering, University of Arizona; and Member, Committee on Critical Mineral Impacts on the U.S. Economy, National Research Council
 
Leonard J. Surges, Director General, Industry Analysis and Business Development, Branch Natural Resources Canada Minerals and Metals Sector; and Member, Committee on Critical Mineral Impacts on the U.S. Economy, National Research Council
 
The unique properties of nonfuel minerals, mineral products, metals, and alloys contribute to provision of food, shelter, infrastructure, transportation, communications, health care, and defense. Minerals are thus fundamental to the domestic economy, national security, and daily life at scales ranging from the individual consumer to entire manufacturing and engineering sectors. The global importance of nonfuel minerals has also been made very evident in recent years as many emerging economies have become both significant producers and consumers of various raw mineral products, in some cases competing for mineral feedstock directly with U.S. producers, manufacturers, and users, including the U.S. military. The report on the National Defense Stockpile (NDS), Managing Materials for a 21st Century Military, assesses the continuing need for and value of the NDS and includes discussion on current defense minerals and materials needs, the national need for the stockpiling of strategic and critical defense-related minerals and materials, and some general principles for any future NDS operation and configuration. The report on Minerals, Critical Minerals, and the U.S. Economy is broader in scope and investigates and highlights the importance of nonfuel minerals in modern U.S. society, which minerals might be termed “critical” and why, the extent to which the availability of these minerals is subject to restriction in the short to the long term, and, when considering mineral criticality, which data, information, and research are needed to aid decision makers in taking appropriate steps to mitigate restrictions in nonfuel mineral supply in a framework that accounts for the complete, global mineral cycle, from exploration to recycling.
 
These briefings were for members of Congress and congressional staff only. Both reports were released to the public on Friday, October 5, 2007 and can be found, in their entireties, on the Web site of the National Academies Press. (To read the reports, please click on the links in the paragraph above.)