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National Academy of Sciences
National Academy of Engineering
Institute of Medicine
National Research Council
 


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Advisory Group


Dr. Barbara A. Schaal, NAS
Washington University, St. Louis

 

Dr. Donald F. Boesch
University of Maryland, Cambridge

 

Dr. Robert S. Carney
Louisiana State University

 

Dr. Stephen R. Carpenter, NAS
University of Wisconsin, Madison

 

Dr. Cortis K. Cooper
Chevron Corporation

 

Dr. Courtney Cowart
Sewanee: The University of the South

 

Dr. Robert A. Duce
Distinguished Professor Emeritus
Texas A&M University, College Station

 

Dr. Deborah Estrin, NAE
Cornell New York City Tech

 

Dr. Christopher B. Field, NAS
Carnegie Institution for Science

 

Dr. Gerardo Gold-Bouchot
Center for Research and Advanced Studies at Merida


Dr. Lynn R. Goldman, IOM
George Washington University

 

Dr. Bernard D. Goldstein, IOM
University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health

 

Dr. Thomas O. Hunter
Sandia National Laboratories (Retired)

 

Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson, NAE
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

 

Dr. Ashanti Johnson
University of Texas at Arlington
Institute for Broadening Participation


Dr. David M. Karl, NAS
University of Hawaii

 

Ms. Molly McCammon
Alaska Ocean Observing System

Dr. Linda A. McCauley, IOM
Emory University

 

Dr. J. Steven Picou
University of South Alabama

 

Dr. Eduardo Salas
University of Central Florida

 

Mr. Kerry Michael St. Pé
Barataria-Terrebonne National Estuary Program

 

Dr. Arnold F. Stancell, NAE
Mobil Oil (Retired)
Georgia Institute of Technology (Emeritus)

 

Dr. LaDon Swann
Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium
Auburn University Marine Programs

 

Mr. James W. Ziglar
Van Ness Feldman

 

Dr. Mark D. Zoback, NAE
Stanford University

 

National Research Council (NRC) Staff


Chris Elfring
Director
 

Bethany Mabee
Research Associate
 

LeighAnne Olsen
Senior Program Officer

Jocelyn Oshrin
Research Assistant
 

Evonne Tang
Senior Program Officer
 

Teri Thorowgood
Manager, Administrative Services
 

Kim Waddell
Senior Program Officer
 

Maggie Walser
Senior Program Officer
 


Ad
visory Group Biographies

 

Dr. Barbara A. Schaal, NAS

Washington University, St. Louis

 

Dr. Barbara A. Schaal, NAS, is the Dean of Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and the Mary-Dell Chilton Distinguished Professor in the Department of Biology. Dr. Schaal uses molecular biology-based approaches to understand evolutionary processes in plants and she works to advance undertanding of molecular population genetics. Dr. Schaal was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1999 for her investigations into the evolution of plant populations and is the first woman elected as vice president of the NAS. Dr. Schaal served as chairperson of Washington University’s Department of Biology, chairperson of the Scientific Advisory Council for the Center for Plant Conservation, President of the Society for the Study of Evolution, Associate Editor for the Journal Molecular Biology and Evolution, and President of the Botanical Society of America. She has received many awards including a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Key Award from the American Genetics Association, and the American Institute of Biological Sciences Distinguished Scientist Award for 2011-12. She is a member of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST). Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton appointed her as one of three Science Envoys for 2012-13. She received her Ph.D. in Population Biology from Yale University in 1974. (Back to Top)

 

Dr. Donald F. Boesch

University of Maryland, Cambridge

 

Dr. Donald F. Boesch is a Professor of Marine Science and President of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. He also serves as Vice Chancellor for Environmental Sustainability for the University System of Maryland. Dr. Boesch is a biological oceanographer who has conducted research in coastal and continental shelf environments along the Atlantic Coast and in the Gulf of Mexico, eastern Australia and the East China Sea. He has published two books and more than 90 papers on marine benthos, estuaries, wetlands, continental shelves, oil pollution, nutrient over-enrichment, environmental assessment and monitoring and science policy. Presently his research focuses on the use of science in ecosystem management, and he is active in extending knowledge to environmental and resource management at regional, national and international levels. Dr. Boesch has served as science advisor to many state and federal agencies and regional, national and international programs, and has chaired numerous committees and scientific assessment teams that have produced reports on a wide variety of coastal environmental and climate change issues. He was a member of the National Academies Committee on America’s Climate Choice and served as chair of the National Research Council’s Ocean Studies Board. A native of New Orleans, Boesch received his B.S. from Tulane University and Ph.D. from the College of William & Mary. He was a Fulbright Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Queensland and subsequently served on the faculty of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science. In 1980 he became the first Executive Director of the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, where he was also a Professor of Marine Science at Louisiana State University. He assumed his present position in Maryland in 1990. Dr. Boesch served as a member of the President’s 7-member Oil Spill Commission, formed immediately after the Deepwater Horizon spill to investigate the root causes of the blowout. (Back to Top)

 

Dr. Robert S. Carney

Louisiana State University

 

Dr. Robert S. Carney is a Professor in Louisiana State University’s Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences. Dr. Carney’s primary research expertise is in deep-ocean biological oceanography, but he also familiar with shallow systems having directed the Coastal Ecology Institute of LSU for 9 years. He has been awarded numerous grants for his research since 1978, including multiple awards from the Minerals Management Service (now BOEM) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to support the new sampling as well as reanalysis of archival deep Gulf of Mexico data. He was a PI in the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Census of Marine Life and co-directs international research on continental margin ecosystems. He is a founding member of INDEEP (International Network for Scientific Investigation of the Deep Sea). In addition to basic science, he has published on the design of oil-related impact studies and information needs of deep ocean management. Dr. Carney has served on the NRC committee investigating the ecosystem services aspect of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. In 1977 Dr. Carney earned a Ph.D. in Oceanography from Oregon State University. (Back to Top)

 

Dr. Stephen R. Carpenter, NAS

University of Wisconsin, Madison

 

Dr. Stephen R. Carpenter, NAS, is S. A. Forbes Professor of Zoology and Director of the Center for Limnology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His research focuses on the interaction of biogeochemistry and food web processes in lakes. He is especially interested in prediction of lake characteristics from land-water interactions and food web processes, including human effects such as fishing and introduction of exotic species. His research on these topics is connected to the LTER, Trophic Cascade, Water Sustainability and Climate, and Bioeconomics of Aquatic Invasive Species projects. Dr. Carpenter also works on resilience of linked social-ecological systems through collaborations with the Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics and Resilience Alliance. Dr. Carpenter’s work in complex systems and early warnings is connected with the Synergy Program for Analyzing Resilience and Critical Transitions (SparcS). He is currently helping in the launch of the South American Institute for Resilience and Sustainability (SARAS). (Back to Top)

 

Dr. Cortis K. Cooper

Chevron Corporation

 

Dr. Cortis K. Cooper works for Chevron and is a Fellow, one of 25 elite scientist and engineers in the company. His primarily technical efforts at Chevron have focused on quantifying winds, waves, and currents for operation and design of offshore facilities worldwide including measuring and modeling oil spill fates; modeling hurricane alleys in the Gulf of Mexico; modeling sea level in the Caspian Sea; forecasting the Loop Current in the Gulf of Mexico; supervising major ocean current models in the Gulf of Mexico, W. Africa, NE Atlantic and NW Australia; leading a 32-company joint industry project (JIP) to improve ocean towing; leading the DeepSpill experiment, a $2 million, 24-company JIP that investigated the fate of oil and gas from deepwater blowouts; and is a leader of the API committee that is funding about $10 M of research to resolve lingering questions regarding the use of subsea dispersants. Dr. Cooper was a member of the 2003 National Research Council’s Committee on Oil in the Sea, and has been heavily involved in the physical oceanography of the Gulf of Mexico for 35 years including two terms on the Board of the IOOS Regional Association. Dr. Cooper brings a wealth of relevant skills to the committee, but his grasp of industry standard operating procedure (SOP) and his understanding of oil dispersion under various oceanographic conditions will be most useful. He earned a Ph.D. in Environmental Engineering from the University of Maine in 1987, and a M.Sc. and B.S. in Civil Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1977 and 1975, respectively. (Back to Top)

 

Dr. Courtney Cowart

Sewanee: The University of the South

 

Dr. Courtney Cowart is a scholar in the fields of ascetical theology and American Church history. In March of 2013 she was appointed Associate Dean and Director of the University of the South’s School of Theology Programs Center. In this new role, Cowart will expand the Center’s programmatic offerings and the reach of its international flagship EfM. Shortly after completing her Th.D., and while serving Trinity Grants in New York, Dr. Cowart played a leading role in the recovery ministry at Trinity Church’s St. Paul’s Chapel following the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. Four years later, she was deployed to New Orleans in the days following Hurricane Katrina, where she served as the co-director of the Office of Disaster Response for the Episcopal Bishop of Louisiana. In this role, she led major collaborations with other non-profits, FEMA, and other agencies. Dr. Cowart is the author of the 2008 book “An American Awakening: From 9/11 to Katrina the People We are Free to Be.” Her on-the-ground post-Katrina work through the Episcopal Church will bring a unique perspective on the communities of the Gulf region to the Advisory Group. She received a Th.D. from The General Theological Seminary of the Episcopal Church of New York in 2001. (Back to Top)

 

Dr. Robert A. Duce

Texas A&M University, College Station

 

Dr. Robert A. Duce is University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Oceanography and Atmospheric Sciences and retired Dean of the College of Geosciences at Texas A&M University, College Station. He was also Dean of the Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island. His research focuses on atmospheric and marine chemistry, including the global cycling of trace elements, and he was awarded the Rosenstiel Award in 1990. He served on the NRC Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, chaired several NRC committees, and is the current chair of the NRC Ocean Studies Board. Dr. Duce is a Fellow of the AGU, AMS, AAAS, and the Oceanography Society. He is a member of the Ocean Research Advisory Panel (ORAP) and is past president of the Oceanography Society, the International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences, the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR), and the International Commission on Atmospheric Chemistry and Global Pollution. He is past chair and current member of the UN Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection and served on the National Sea Grant Advisory Board, the NSF Geosciences Advisory Committee, and the IGBP Scientific Committee. (Back to Top)

 

Dr. Deborah Estrin, NAE

Cornell New York City Tech

 

Dr. Deborah L. Estrin, NAE, is a Professor of Computer Science and the first Professor hired for Cornell NYC Tech, the new tech campus being developed on Roosevelt Island in New York City. She is also Professor of Public Health at Weill Cornell Medical College and is co-founder of the non-profit startup, Open mHealth (http://openmhealth.org). She was previously Professor of Computer Science at UCLA and the founding director of the NSF-funded Center for Embedded Networked Sensing. Estrin is a pioneer in networked sensing, which uses mobile and wireless systems to collect and analyze real time data about the physical world and the people who occupy it. Dr. Estrin's work has shown how the data streaming from networks of such devices as smartphones and cameras can enrich our understanding and management of complex problems -- from personal and public health to civic engagement. Estrin’s current focus is on mobile health, leveraging the programmability, proximity, and pervasiveness of mobile devices and the cloud for health management. She has also shown a commitment to K-12 education, spearheading a groundbreaking internship program for Los Angeles high school students in mobile technologies and data. Her early research focused on the design of network and routing protocols for very large, global, networks, including: multicast routing protocols, self-configuring protocol mechanisms for scalability and robustness, and tools and methods for designing and studying large scale networks. In the late 90’s, she began her work in embedded networked sensing systems, with emphasis on environmental monitoring applications. Dr. Estrin received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1985. (Back to Top)

 

Dr. Christopher B. Field, NAS

Carnegie Institution for Science

 

Chris Field is the founding director of the Carnegie Institution's Department of Global Ecology, Melvin and Joan Lane Professor for Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies at Stanford University, and Faculty Director of Stanford's Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve. Field’s research emphasizes impacts of climate change, from the molecular to the global scale. He has, for two decades, led major experiments on responses of California grassland to multi-factor global change. Field has been deeply involved with national and international scale efforts to advance science and assessment related to global ecology and climate change. He is co-chair of Working Group II of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which in 2012 led the effort on the IPCC Special Report on “Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation” and which is currently working on the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report, scheduled for release in 2014. He is a recipient of a Heinz Award and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Field is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Ecological Society of America. Field received his Ph.D. from Stanford in 1981 and has been at the Carnegie Institution for Science since 1984. (Back to Top)

 

Dr. Gerardo Gold-Bouchot

Center for Research and Advanced Studies at Merida

 

Dr. Gerardo Gold-Bouchot is a Professor at the Center for Research and Advanced Studies at Merida. Dr. Gold-Bouchot’s research interests include toxic pollutants and their effects in the marine environment. For outstanding work was selected as a member of the Regional Group of Experts on Marine Pollution in the Wider Caribbean, IOCARIBE / UNESCO, as a member of the IOCARIBE / UNEP Joint Group of Experts on Marine Pollution in the Wider Caribbean, member of the North- American Analytical Quality Control and Assurance Program, member of the Joint Working Group on Oceanography: National Academy of Sciences (United States)-Academy of Scientific Research (Mexico), and Steering Group member of the Solid Waste in the Greater Caribbean program. He has also been honored as a member of the register of Assessors for CONACyT Projects and member of the National Researchers System (Level II). Coordinated the project "Transboundary Diagnostic Analysis and Strategic Action Plan for the Large Marine Ecosystem Gulf of Mexico", funded by the Global Environmental Fund (GEF) in the preparation phase, coordinated the pilot project monitoring and environmental assessment the operational phase of the project, and currently coordinates the implementation phase. He also coordinates the project to establish the environmental baseline of the continental shelf of the Yucatan Peninsula. In 2008 his laboratory was designated as Regional Laboratory for the analysis of pesticides in eight Caribbean countries. He received his Ph.D. in Marine Sciences from Center for Research and Advanced Studies at Merida in 1991. (Back to Top)

 

Dr. Lynn R. Goldman, IOM

George Washington University

 

Dr. Lynn R. Goldman, IOM, is Dean of the School of Public Health at George Washington University. From 1999-2010 she served as a Professor of Environmental Health Sciences at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, as well as the Principal Investigator for the Johns Hopkins National Children’s Study Center and dual principal investigator for the National Center of Excellence for the Study of Preparedness and Catastrophic Event Response (PACER). Between 1993-1998, she was Assistant Administrator for the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention. Prior to that, Dr. Goldman served in several positions at the California Department of Public Health, including head of the Division of Environmental and Occupational Disease Control. She has conducted public health investigations on pesticides, childhood lead poisoning, hazardous waste and other environmental hazards, including response to chemical releases. Dr. Goldman earned her M.D. from the University of California, San Francisco, M.S. in Health and Medical Sciences from the University of California, Berkeley, M.P.H. from John Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health and B.S. from the University of California Berkeley. Dr. Goldman chaired the IOM Committee to Review the Federal Response to the Health Effects Associated with the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill, participated in the IOM’s workshop on Assessing the Effects of the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill on Human Health and formerly was a member of the IOM Forum and Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Catastrophic Events. She is a member of the IOM Council and the NAS Report Review Committee and Vice Chair of the IOM Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research and Medicine. (Back to Top)

 

Dr. Bernard D. Goldstein, IOM

University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health

 

Dr. Goldstein, IOM, is emeritus professor of environmental and occupational health and former dean of the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. Dr Goldstein is an elected member of the National Academies of Science Institute of Medicine (IOM) where he serves on the Environmental Health Science Research and Training Roundtable. For the National Research Council he is a member of the Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability, has recently chaired the Committee on Sustainability at EPA, and is a member of the committee organizing workshops on Risk Management and Governance of Shale Gas. He also serves on committees related to shale gas and energy issues for the Canadian Council of Academies, the Energy Institute of the Province of New Brunswick and the NSF-funded AirWaterGas Sustainability Research Network at the University of Colorado . He has chaired numerous national and international committees related to environmental health, most recently the UN Environmental Program Working Group on Chemical Governance. Dr. Goldstein was a participant in the IOM’s workshop on Assessing the Effects of the Gulf of Mexico oil spill on human health. Currently he chairs the Coordinating Committee of the Gulf Region Health Outreach Program and is a member of the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Public Health Working Group. His experience includes service as Assistant Administrator for Research and Development of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1983-1985. (Back to Top)

 

Dr. Thomas O. Hunter

Sandia National Laboratories (Retired)

 

Dr. Thomas (Tom) O. Hunter retired in July 2010 as President and Laboratories Director of Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia, with principal sites in Albuquerque, NM, and Livermore, CA, is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. Dr. Hunter joined Sandia in 1967 and became President in April 2005. His responsibilities included managing the Laboratories' $2.3 billion annual budget and approximately 8,700 employees. Dr. Hunter led Sandia and U.S. DOE laboratory programs to establish cooperative R&D programs in the former Soviet Union to support nuclear nonproliferation. Since retiring, Dr. Hunter has served in various roles including leader with Dr. Steven Chu, DOE, of the government’s science team for the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, coauthor of a major analysis in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Applications of science and engineering to quantify and control the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, and chairman of Ocean Energy Safety Advisory Committee for Department of Interior. He is a member of the PCAST panel for the report: Transformation and Opportunity: The Future of the US Research Enterprise. He is a current member of the Engineering Advisory Board for the University of Florida, Council on Foreign Relations, American Nuclear Society, and the U. S. Strategic Command's Strategic Advisory Group. Dr. Hunter earned a B.S.M.E. from the University of Florida, an M.S.M.E. from the University of New Mexico, an M.S.N.E. from the University of Wisconsin, and a Ph.D. in Nuclear Engineering from the University of Wisconsin. He was recognized as a Distinguished Alumnus by both the University of Florida and the University of Wisconsin. (Back to Top)

 

Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson, NAE

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

 

President of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, in Troy, NY and Hartford, CT, Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson, NAE, has held senior leadership positions in government, industry, research, and academe. A theoretical physicist, she was chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (1995-1999). She serves on the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. President of Rensselaer since 1999, Dr. Jackson has led an extraordinary transformation of the institute with an ambitious strategic effort known as The Rensselaer Plan. Under her leadership, new faculty members have been hired, research awards have doubled and scholarships have increased. There have been innovations in curriculum, expansion of undergraduate research, and new award winning student life initiatives. Nearly $1 billion has been invested in The Rensselaer Plan, including in new construction, renovations, new equipment, technology and infrastructure. Her research and policy focus includes energy security and the national capacity for innovation, including addressing the “Quiet Crisis” of looming gaps in the science, technology, and engineering workforce and reduced support for basic research. She is an International Fellow of the British Royal Academy of Engineering, a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), a Regent of the Smithsonian Institution, and a member several other prestigious scientific and policy organizations. She is a member of the Board of the Council on Foreign Relations, World Economic Forum USA, and of global companies including IBM, FedEx, and Medtronic. She holds a S.B. in physics and a Ph.D. in theoretical elementary particle physics, both from M.I.T.. (Back to Top)

 

Dr. Ashanti Johnson

University of Texas, Arlington

 

Dr. Ashanti Johnson is the Executive Director of the Institute for Broadening Participation, which has the mission of increasing the diversity of the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) workforce, and the Assistant Vice Provost for Faculty Recruitment and Associate Professor of Earth and Environmental Science at the University of Texas at Arlington (UT Arlington). Dr. Johnson has served as a faculty member for the Georgia Institute of Technology’s School of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, the Savannah State University’s Marine Science Program, the University of South Florida’s College of Marine Science, and most recently the UT Arlington’s Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences. Her areas of research specialization include: 1) aquatic radiogeochemistry, 2) professional development of students and early career professionals, and 3) STEM diversity-focused initiatives. She currently serves as the director of one of four NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative (OSSI) Broker-Facilitator Corps, as well as the director for the NASA and NSF-funded Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science Initiative. She is also the PI of the NSF-funded Pathways to Ocean Science Project and Co-PI of the NSF-funded Pathways to Engineering Project. In 1999 she became one of the first female African-American Chemical Oceanographers in the country when she received a doctoral degree in Oceanography from Texas A&M University. Her recent service activities include serving on the steering committee for the American Academy of Microbiology’s Training the Microbiologist of the Future Colloquium, being on the executive committee of CHANGES - the Coalition of Hispanic, African and Native Americans for the Next Generation of Engineers and Scientists, and participating in the White House Workshop on STEM Minority Inclusion, as well as the White House Forum on Minorities in Energy. Dr. Johnson has received numerous honors and awards. In 2010 she received a Presidential Award for Excellence in Science Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring at the White House in recognition of her professional development and diversity-related activities and was recognized by TheGrio.com, an NBC product, as one of 100 History Makers in The Making. In she was profiled in the Black Enterprise Magazine March 2011 Issue’s “Women In STEM” Feature Story. Dr. Johnson received her Ph.D. (1999) in Oceanography from TAMU. (Back to Top)

 

Dr. David M. Karl, NAS

University of Hawaii

 

Dr. David M. Karl, NAS, is a microbial biologist and oceanographer in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawaii, whose research interests include the ecology of microorganisms, microbiological and biogeochemical oceanography and oceanic productivity. By integrating observations and measurements at scales ranging from cellular to oceanic, Dr. Karl has led the development of a quantitative understanding of the marine carbon cycle and global biogeochemistry. Dr. Karl is director of and was instrumental in establishing the University of Hawaii’s Center for Microbial Oceanography for Research and Education (C-MORE), an NSF-supported Science and Technology Center established in 2006 to facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of the diverse assemblages of microorganisms in the sea, ranging from the genetic basis of marine microbial biogeochemistry including the metabolic regulation and environmental controls of gene expression, to the processes that underpin the fluxes of carbon, related bioelements and energy in the marine environment. He was elected to the NAS in 2006 and has received numerous national and international honors and awards throughout his 35 years at UH Manoa. Dr. Karl has served on NRC committees focused on planning International Polar Year, stewardship while exploring subglacial lakes in Antarctic (2007), and reviewing North Pacific Research Board (Alaska) (2005). In the course of his career, Karl has spent more than three full years at sea, including 23 expeditions to Antarctica. (Back to Top)

 

Ms. Molly McCammon

Alaska Ocean Observing System

 

Ms. Molly McCammon serves as Executive Director of the Alaska Ocean Observing System (AOOS), a coalition of government, academic, and private partners working together to integrate critical ocean and coastal observations, data and information products that aid understanding of the status of Alaska’s marine ecosystem and allow stakeholders to make better decisions about their use of the marine environment. AOOS is the Alaska regional component of the national Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS), created by Congress to add value to ocean monitoring products to meet stakeholder needs. Prior to directing AOOS, she served for nearly a decade as the Executive Director for the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Trustee Council, administering the restoration fund established as a result of a court settlement between the United States government and the state of Alaska and Exxon Corporation following the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill. During her tenure at the Trustee Council, she managed the Trustee Council’s $20 million a year research and monitoring program and helped plan the Gulf Ecosystem Monitoring Program, a long-term ecological monitoring program for the northern Gulf of Alaska. She has served as the chair of the National Federation of Regional Associations for Coastal and Ocean Observing (now the IOOS Association) and is a member of the Ocean Research Advisory Panel, which advises federal ocean research agencies, and the Polar Research Board. She serves as the Municipality of Anchorage representative on the Cook Inlet Regional Citizens Advisory Council, a public oversight group for Cook Inlet Alaska oil and gas activities established by the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Ms. McCammon graduated from University of California Berkeley with a degree in journalism, and started her career in Alaska as a reporter. (Back to Top)

 

Dr. Linda A. McCauley, IOM

Emory University

 

Dr. Linda A. McCauley, IOM, is Professor and Dean of Emory University’s Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing. Dr. McCauley has special expertise in the design of epidemiological investigations of environmental hazards and is nationally recognized for her expertise in occupational and environmental health nursing. Her work aims to identify culturally appropriate interventions to decrease the impact of environmental and occupational health hazards in vulnerable populations, including workers and young children. Dr. McCauley was previously the Associate Dean for Research and the Nightingale Professor in Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing. She received a B.S. in Nursing from the University of North Carolina, a M.S. in Nursing from Emory University, and a Ph.D. in Environmental Health and Epidemiology from the University of Cincinnati. A member of the Institute of Medicine, she is active on the Environmental Health Roundtable and the Board of Population Health. She currently serves as a member of the National Advisory Environmental Health Sciences Council. (Back to Top)

 

Dr. J. Steven Picou

University of South Alabama

 

Dr. J. Steven Picou is a Professor of Sociology at the University of South Alabama and the Director of the Coastal Resource & Resiliency Center, Community Health Workers Training Project. He served as Chair of the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work for 20 years (1988-2008) and has held previous academic and research appointments at The Ohio State University and Texas A&M University. During his career, he has published over 150 peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and research monographs in the areas of environmental sociology, disasters, applied sociology, social stratification, and social theory. He has co-authored, co-edited, and contributed to four books including The Exxon Valdez Disaster (1997), and The Sociology of Katrina (2nd edition 2010). Dr. Picou has received funding from agencies such as the National Science Foundation, Environmental Protection Agency, US Office of Education, Alabama Department of Environmental Management, Prince William Sound Regional Citizens’ Advisory Council, MS-AL Sea Grant Consortium, The Rockefeller Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, and the BP Medical Claims Settlement. He is currently serving as Principal Investigator of three major research projects on the Exxon Valdez oil spill, Hurricane Katrina, and the Deepwater Horizon spill. Dr. Picou received his Ph.D. in Sociology from Louisiana State University in 1971. (Back to Top)

 

Dr. Eduardo Salas

University of Central Florida

 

Eduardo Salas is Pegasus & Trustee Chair Professor of Psychology at the University of Central Florida where he also holds an appointment as Program Director for the Human Systems Integration Research Department at the Institute for Simulation and Training. Previously, he was the Director of UCF's Applied Experimental & Human Factors Ph.D. Program. Before joining IST, he was a senior research psychologist and Head of the Training Technology Development Branch of NAWC-TSD for 15 years. During this period, Dr. Salas served as a principal investigator for numerous R&D programs, including TADMUS, that focused on teamwork, team training, decision-making under stress and performance assessment. Dr. Salas has co-authored over 450 journal articles & book chapters and has co-edited 25 books. His expertise includes assisting organizations in how to foster teamwork, design and implement team training strategies, facilitate training effectiveness, manage decision making under stress, and develop performance measurement tools. Dr. Salas is a Past President of the Society for Industrial/Organizational Psychology, Fellow of the American Psychological Association, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society(HFES), and a recipient of the Meritorious Civil Service Award from the Department of the Navy. He is currently President of the HFES. He is also the recipient of the 2012 Society for Human Resource Management Losey Lifetime Achievement Award, and the 2012 Joseph E. McGrath Award for Lifetime Achievement. (Back to Top)

 

Mr. Kerry Michael St. Pé

Barataria-Terrebonne National Estuary Program

 

Mr. Kerry St. Pé is the Executive Director of the Barataria-Terrebonne National Estuary Program (BTNEP), a nationally recognized effort dedicated to preserving and restoring the 4.2 million-acre area between the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers in Southeast, Louisiana. Mr. St. Pé grew up near the mouth of the Mississippi River in Port Sulphur, Louisiana during the ‘50s and ‘60s where the vast coastal marshes surrounding his home inspired him to become a marine biologist. Mr. St. Pé worked for 23 years as a field biologist and regional coordinator for the Water Pollution Control Division of the Louisiana Departments of Wildlife and Fisheries and Environmental Quality. His work allowed him frequent encounters with the people, marshes, and swamps of the area now known as the Barataria-Terrebonne National Estuary. Under the Water Pollution Control Division, he investigated water pollution incidents and conducted studies of shell dredging and other environmental impacts in Lakes Maurepas and Pontchartrain as well as a major study on the impacts of oilfield brine in coastal La. His oilfield brine study was an important catalyst in getting both state and federal regulations established to stop these discharges to Louisiana water bodies. Mr. St. Pé has directed hundreds of oil spill removal and remediation events in the coastal marshes of southeast Louisiana and has developed nationally-used training courses on diagnosing causes of fish mortalities. His wetland restoration work has been featured in the best selling book Bayou Farewell, the Rich Life and Tragic Death of Louisiana’s Cajun Coast by Mike Tidwell and in the PBS documentary, Washing Away: Losing Louisiana and the LPB documentary, Turning the Tide. Mr. St. Pé has also received several Outstanding Publication Awards from the Louisiana Wildlife Biologists Association and has twice been awarded (1996, 2006)the Annual Coastal Stewardship Award from the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana. Mr. St. Pé was appointed as the Interim Administrator of the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium (LUMCON) from July 2002 to June 2005. Mr. St. Pé was awarded the Gulf Guardian Award in 2009 in the Individual Category by the EPA Gulf of Mexico Program. In May of 2010, he was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Science by Nicholls State University. (Back to Top)

 

Dr. Arnold F. Stancell, NAE

Mobil Oil (Retired)

 

Arnold F. Stancell, NAE, received a B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering (magna cum laude) from The City College of New York, and a Sc.D. degree in Chemical Engineering from The Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a licensed Professional Engineer in New York and Connecticut. Dr. Stancell is Turner Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Emeritus, at Georgia Institute of Technology. He joined Georgia tech in 1994. This followed his 31 year career at Mobil Oil where he started in research and progressed to senior management positions in plastics manufacture, corporate planning, marketing and refining and exploration and production. He was vice president, U.S. exploration and production 1987-89, with 8,000 employees, and in 1989-93 he was vice president for Europe (U.K., Norway, Germany and Austria), the Middle East (Saudi Arabia, Abu Dhabi, Qatar) and Australia. In 1992, he initiated, negotiated and launched the now $70 billion joint venture between Mobil and Qatar for the production, marketing and transportation of liquefied natural gas to markets worldwide. In his early career in research, he was awarded 11 patents and developed processes for low cost, solvent-free, low pressure polyethylene manufacture, commercial terephthalic acid (polyester intermediate} purification, and the first commercial process for polybutene-1. He started a new field of plasma (ionized gas) reactions at surfaces to produce useful surface structures. He continued this work at MIT when he was invited to be Visiting Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering in 1970-71 on leave from Mobil. His doctoral student in the plasma research, David Lam, went on to be founder of Lam Research, a major manufacturer of equipment that is widely used to fluoride plasma etch electronic circuits into silicon chips. Dr. Stancell was offered tenure at MIT in 1971, but he decided to return to Mobil. He consulted for the U.S. Department of the Interior shortly after the BP oil spill and advised on steps to improve offshore oil drilling safety that were announced by President Obama on May 28, 2010. The following year, the President appointed him to the National science Board which oversees the work of the National Science Foundation and the awarding of $7.5 billion dollars annually in research grants and education. Dr. Stancell was elected to the NAE in 1997 and was elected to the NAE Council in 2009. He also serves on the Governing Board of the National Research Council. He has received the AIChE Chemical Engineering Practice Award (1997), Outstanding Chemical Engineering Professor Award at Georgia Tech (1997, 2004), and the Career Achievement Award (1993) and Townsend Harris Medal Award (2009) of the City College of New York. (Back to Top)

 

Dr. LaDon Swann

Auburn University

 

Dr. LaDon Swann is Director of the Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium (MASGC), and Director of the Auburn University’s Marine Programs. He received BS and MS from Tennessee Technological University and a Ph.D. from Purdue University. Dr. Swann is responsible for implementing practical solutions to coastal issues through competitive research, graduate student training, and extension and outreach and K-12 education in Alabama and Mississippi. He also has over 26 years of experience designing, delivering and evaluating engagement programs addressing local, regional and national needs. He is actively involved in regional engagement through the NOAA Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaboration Team, multiple Gulf of Mexico Alliance priority issues teams. During 2010 and 2011 Dr. Swann served on the Oil Spill Recovery Commissions for Alabama and Mississippi, Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force, and served as a primary point of contact for NOAA’s engagement efforts. In 2012 Dr. Swann served on the Mississippi GoCoast 2020 oil spill recovery planning effort. Dr. Swann is the President of the National Sea Grant Association and is Co-Chair of Sea Grant’s Hazard Resilient Coastal Communities Focus Team. He is also served as President of the U.S. Aquaculture Association. (Back to Top)

 

Mr. James W. Ziglar

Van Ness Feldman

 

Mr. James W. Ziglar is a Senior Counsel at Van Ness Feldman, LLP, where he provides strategic business and policy advice to clients on issues relating to energy, natural resources and the environment, and on public infrastructure finance and homeland security. He has a total of 48 years of experience in law, investment banking, corporate management, education and public policy. In addition to his 30 years of experience in the private sector, Mr. Ziglar has served in the federal government as Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Water and Science, Sergeant at Arms of the U.S. Senate, Commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, Law Clerk to U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Harry A. Blackmun, and a staff aide in the U.S. Senate. Mr. Ziglar also was a Distinguished Visiting Professor of Law at The George Washington University Law School and a Resident Fellow at Harvard University’s JFK School of Government Institute of Politics. He serves on the Water Science and Technology Board of the Division of Earth and Life Studies, and on the Board of Councilors of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. (Back to Top)

 

Dr. Mark D. Zoback, NAE

Stanford University

 

Dr. Mark D. Zoback, NAE, is the Benjamin M. Page Professor of Geophysics at Stanford University. He is also Co-Director of the Stanford Rock Physics and Borehole Geophysics industrial consortium. Dr. Zoback conducts research on in situ stress, fault mechanics, and reservoir geomechanics. He is the author of a textbook entitled Reservoir Geomechanics and was co-PI of SAFOD, the scientific drilling project that drilled and sampled the San Andreas Fault at 3 km depth. He also serves as a senior adviser to Baker Hughes, Inc. Dr. Zoback served as a member of the NRC committee that produced the report “Macondo Well Deepwater Horizon Blowout: Lessons for Improving Offshore Drilling Safety.” He recently served on the National Academy of Energy committee investigating the Deepwater Horizon accident and the Secretary of Energy’s committee on shale gas development and environmental protection. He currently serves on a Canadian Council of Academies panel investigating the same topic. Dr. Zoback was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2011. He received a Ph.D. in Geophysics from Stanford University. (Back to Top)

NRC Staff Biography

 

Chris Elfring


Chris Elfing is Executive Director of the NAS’s new Gulf Research Program. Her role, with guidance from a carefully selected Advisory Group, is to guide the program’s planning and initial implementation, building from the general requirements in the Settlement Agreement to a multi-faceted science program of lasting impact. She is responsible for overseeing all aspects of starting the new program, including strategic planning, community outreach, interactions with the relevant stakeholders and scientific advisors, staff and budget management, and implementation as activities are designed.

Previously, Ms. Elfring was Director of both the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate (BASC) and the Polar Research Board (PRB), where she was responsible for strategic planning, project development and oversight, financial management, and personnel. Work under her oversight addressed many aspects of polar science (covering issues in the Arctic, Antarctic, and cold regions, from icebreakers to research priorities in Antarctica) and weather and climate science (covering issues from climate modeling and climate change impacts to weather forecasting and urban meteorology). She provided strategic leadership to the suite of activities known as “America’s Climate Choices.” She was a leader in the planning of International Polar Year 2007-2008, and has a geographic feature in Antarctica, Elfring Peak, named in her honor of her polar science work.

Ms. Elfring has a long-standing interest in the policy dimensions of science and communicating science to non-scientists. She began her career in Washington as a AAAS Science Fellow in 1979. In 2012, the American Meteorological Society (AMS) awarded her the Cleveland Abbe Award for Distinguished Service to the Atmospheric Sciences and she was elected an AMS Fellow. (Back to Top)