Meeting

Scaling up best practices in Community-based Health Professional Education: A Workshop


When: May 1, 2014 - May 2, 2014 (9:00 AM Eastern)
Where: Keck Center (Room 100) • 500 Fifth St. NW, Washington, DC 20001

Topics Education, Global Health, Health Care Workforce
Activity: Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education
Board: Board on Global Health

There is growing evidence from developed and developing countries that community-based approaches are effective in improving the health of individuals and populations. This is especially true when the social determinants of health are considered in the design of the community-based approach. With an aging population and an emphasis on health promotion, the United States is increasingly focusing on community-based health and health care.

There is growing evidence from developed and developing countries that community-based approaches are effective in improving the health of individuals and populations. This is especially true when the social determinants of health are considered in the design of the community-based approach. With an aging population and an emphasis on health promotion, the United States is increasingly focusing on community-based health and health care.

Preventing disease and promoting health calls for a holistic approach to health interventions that rely more heavily upon interprofessional collaborations. However, the financial and structural design of health professional education remains siloed and largely focused on academic health centers for training. Despite these challenges, there are good examples of interprofessional, community-based programs and curricula for educating health professionals. Some of these examples make use of new technologies in reaching rural communities for education; provide mechanisms for faculty development and curriculum delivery for health professions students training there; and/or based health professions in the communities of need in order to create the workforce required for those communities. This improves the workforce in remote areas (in both quality and quantity) where there may be few, if any, educated health providers. In this way, the needs of diverse communities are met by those who live in the community thereby improving health equity and decreasing disparities among typically underserved populations.

These issues were examined in a 2-day May 1-2, 2014 public workshop that was planned and organized by an ad hoc committee of the IOM. The committee developed a workshop agenda, select and invite speakers and discussants, and moderate the discussions. Following the workshop, an individually authored summary of the event will be prepared by a designated rapporteur.

The workshop was free and open to the public. PowerPoint presentations and videos of the webcast recordings can be found in the links on the right side of this page.

To download the workshop summary for free, click here.


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