Meeting

Interpersonal Violence Syndemics and Co-occurring Epidemics: Preventing Violence in the Context of Opioid Misuse, Suicide, Social Disparities, and HIV: A Workshop


When: May 16, 2019 - May 17, 2019 (9:00 AM Eastern)
Where: National Academy of Sciences Building (Lecture Room) • 2101 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20418

Topics Global Health, Children and Families, Substance Use and Mental Health
Activity: Forum on Global Violence Prevention
Boards: Board on Global Health, Board on Children, Youth, and Families, DBASSE Committee on Law and Justice


 

The Global Violence Prevention Forum aims to facilitate dialogue and exchange by bringing together experts from diverse areas of violence prevention, including: behavioral scientists, policy makers, criminal justice professionals, social service providers, economists, legal experts, journalists, philanthropists, faith-based organizations, and corporate social responsibility officers. In keeping with the overall goal of the Forum to reduce the burden of violence and promote the healthy development of individuals and communities, the Forum opens up potential for prevention in all parts of the world. 

A syndemic is the aggregation of two or more concurrent or sequential epidemics or disease clusters in a population, which exacerbates the prognosis and burden of disease. This two-day public workshop will explore opportunities to improve our understanding of violence and its prevention by examining the contribution of both interpersonal and self-directed violence to syndemics and co-occurring epidemics in the U.S. and globally. Workshop presentations and discussion topics will focus on three syndemics/co-occurring epidemics:

  • opioid use disorder, violence, suicide, and mental health in the United States
  • adverse childhood experiences (ACES) and childhood trauma; adult violence and victimization; and health outcomes from a global perspective
  • HIV and violence.

The workshop will aim to explore the interconnections between these global public health issues. It will highlight the critical gaps in our evidence base surrounding these syndemics/co-occurring epidemics. It will also explore possible prevention and intervention strategies that address these interrelated epidemics beyond siloed interventions that do not take into account the nature of multi-dimensional disorders with overlapping etiologies.

This workshop will be free and open to the public. 

 

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