About Publications

Publications from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes Health and Medicine Division (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.

Reports Index


  • Evaluation of the Disability Determination Process for Traumatic Brain Injury in Veterans Released: April 10, 2019
    At the mandate of the U.S. Congress, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) contracted with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to convene a committee to review the process by which the VA assesses impairments relating to TBI for purposes of awarding disability compensation.
  • Health System Interventions to Prevent Firearms Injuries and Death: Proceedings of a Workshop Released: February 28, 2019
    Firearm injuries and death are a serious public health concern in the United States that place a burden on individuals, communities, and health care systems. At the suggestion of Kaiser Permanente, and with the support of both Kaiser Permanente and the American Hospital Association, the Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop that examined the roles that health systems can play in addressing the epidemic of firearm violence in the United States.
  • Improving Care to Prevent Suicide Among People with Serious Mental Illness: Proceedings of a Workshop Released: December 28, 2018
    On September 11–12, 2018, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine held a workshop in Washington, DC, to discuss what is known, what is currently being done, and what needs to be done to identify and reduce suicide risk among people with serious mental illness in the United States.
  • Gulf War and Health: Volume 11: Generational Health Effects of Serving in the Gulf War Released: November 28, 2018
    In response to health concerns of Gulf War veterans, Congress in 1998 directed the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to contract with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to evaluate the scientific and medical literature regarding associations between illness and exposure to the toxic agents, environmental and wartime hazards, and preventive medicines and vaccines associated with Gulf War service.
  • Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 11 (2018) Released: November 15, 2018
    This report, Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 11 (2018), presents the committee’s analysis of peer-reviewed, scientific reports published between September 30, 2014, and December 31, 2017, about associations between various health outcomes and exposure to TCDD and other chemicals in the herbicides used in Vietnam. The report also takes into account information from the existing evidence base.
  • Evaluation of the Department of Veterans Affairs Mental Health Services Released: January 31, 2018
    Approximately 4 million U.S. veterans supported the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan—Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and Operation New Dawn—and many have need for mental health care services. Under a Congressional mandate responding to concerns about the health care experience of these veterans, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) asked the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to assemble a committee of experts to assess veterans’ ability to access mental health services at the VA, as well as the quality of those services.
  • Assessment of the Department of Veterans Affairs Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit Registry Released: February 28, 2017
    Concerns over possible adverse effects of wartime exposure to smoke from trash burning in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other locations in Southwest Asia have stimulated both research and Congressional action. Public Law 112-260, § 201 (enacted January 10, 2013) directed the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to establish and maintain a registry for service members who may have been exposed to toxic airborne chemicals and fumes generated by open burn pits. VA asked the National Academies to take on the responsibility to fulfill a provision of this law that called for an independent scientific organization to prepare a report addressing issues related to the establishment and conduct of the registry and use of the information it collects.
  • Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2014 Released: March 10, 2016
    From 1962 to 1971, US military sprayed herbicides over Vietnam. Congress passed the Agent Orange Act of 1991 to address whether exposure to these herbicides contributed to long term health effects in Vietnam veterans. The legislation directed the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to request the IOM to perform a comprehensive evaluation of scientific and medical information regarding possible health effects of exposure to Agent Orange and other herbicides used in Vietnam or to TCDD and other chemicals in those herbicides. Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2014 is the tenth and last congressionally mandated biennial update. The current update presents this committee’s review of peer-reviewed scientific reports relevant to this question that were published between October 1, 2012, and September 30, 2014, and its integration with the previously established evidence database.
  • Gulf War and Health: Volume 10: Update of Health Effects of Serving in the Gulf War Released: February 11, 2016
    In response to the variety of health problems and symptoms reported by veterans, Congress passed two laws directing the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to contract with the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to review and evaluate the scientific and medical literature regarding associations between illness and exposure to toxic agents, environmental or wartime hazards, or preventive measures and vaccines associated with Gulf War service.
  • Assessing Health Outcomes Among Veterans of Project SHAD (Shipboard Hazard and Defense) Released: January 08, 2016
    In the 1960s, close to 5,900 military personnel, mostly Navy and Marines, participated in Project SHAD—a series of classified tests of U.S. warship vulnerability to biological and chemical warfare agents.