About Publications

Publications from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes Health and Medicine Division (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Nutrition Across the Lifespan for Healthy Aging: Proceedings ... Released: May 18, 2017
    More than 46 million people over the age of 65 years were living in the United States in 2014 and more than 70 million are predicted by 2060. Education, living arrangements, and other demographic characteristics of this older population are changing, with noted variability by sex and race/ethnicity. Health status indicators, including life expectancy and heart disease death rates, have shown improvement, as have economic indicators.
  • Nutrition across the Lifespan for Healthy Aging: Proceedings ... Released: December 29, 2016
    More than 46 million people over the age of 65 years were living in the United States in 2014 and more than 70 million are predicted by 2060. Education, living arrangements, and other demographic characteristics of this older population are changing, with noted variability by sex and race/ethnicity. Health status indicators, including life expectancy and heart disease death rates, have shown improvement, as have economic indicators. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Food Forum convened a workshop with five objectives
  • Food Literacy: How Do Communications and Marketing ... Released: April 27, 2016
    On September 3–4, 2015, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Food and Nutrition Board convened a workshop in Washington, DC, to discuss how communications and marketing impact consumer knowledge, skills, and behavior around food, nutrition, and healthy eating.
  • Food Literacy: How Do Communications and Marketing ... Released: November 06, 2015
    On September 3–4, 2015, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Food and Nutrition Board convened a workshop in Washington, DC, to discuss how communications and marketing impact consumer knowledge, skills, and behavior around food, nutrition, and healthy eating.
  • Relationships Among the Brain, the Digestive System, and ... Released: March 13, 2015
    On July 9-10, 2014, the Institute of Medicine’s Food Forum hosted a public workshop to explore emerging and rapidly developing research on relationships among the brain, the digestive system, and eating behavior. Drawing on expertise from the fields of nutrition and food science, animal and human physiology and behavior, and psychology and psychiatry as well as related fields, the purpose of the workshop was to review current knowledge on the relationship between the brain and eating behavior, explore the interaction between the brain and the digestive system, and consider what is known about the brain’s role in eating patterns and consumer choice; evaluate current methods used to determine the impact of food on brain activity and eating behavior; and identify gaps in knowledge and articulate a theoretical framework for future research.
  • Relationships Among the Brain, the Digestive System, and ... Released: September 01, 2014
    On July 9-10, 2014, the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM’s) Food Forum hosted a public workshop to explore emerging and rapidly developing research on relationships between the brain, digestive system, and eating behavior. The figure below illustrates the complex relationships between the brain, digestive system, and eating behavior and the influence of biology and the environment.
  • Sustainable Diets: Food for Healthy People and a Healthy ... Released: February 10, 2014
    While one of the many benefits of the U.S. food system is a safe, nutritious, and consistent food supply, that same system also places significant strain on land, water, air, and other natural resources. A better understanding of the food-environment synergies and trade-offs associated with the U.S. food system would be one way to help reduce this strain. Part of the challenge is that experts in the fields of nutrition, agricultural science, and natural resource use do not regularly collaborate with each other. In order to bring together experts in these fields, the IOM’s Food Forum and Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine held a workshop May 7-8, 2013.
  • The Human Microbiome, Diet, and Health - Workshop ... Released: October 24, 2012
    One of the most intimate relationships that our body has with the outside world is through our gut. Our gastrointestinal tracts harbor a vast and still largely unexplored microbial world known as the human microbiome that scientists are only just beginning to understand. Researchers are recognizing the integral role of the microbiome in human physiology, health, and disease, and the intimate nature of the relationships between microbiome and host. While there is still a great deal to learn, the newfound knowledge already is being used to develop dietary interventions aimed at preventing and modifying disease risk by leveraging the microbiome. The IOM held a public workshop to explore current and emerging knowledge on the human microbiome, its role in human health, its interaction with the diet, and the translation of new research findings into tools and products that improve the healthfulness of the food supply.
  • Building Public-Private Partnerships in Food and Nutrition ... Released: June 05, 2012
    The leading public health problems – ranging from rising obesity rates to the fast-growing population of older adults – are so complex that no single sector can effectively address them alone. To solve them requires collaborative partnership between the public and private sectors, including industry, government, academia, and nongovernmental organizations. The IOM’s Food Forum held a workshop in November 2011 to better understand how to build multisectoral food and nutrition partnerships that achieve meaningful public health results. The workshop brought together stakeholders from multiple sectors to discuss the benefits of these partnerships, and what needs to be done to foster partnership development to promote public health.
  • Leveraging Food Technology for Obesity Prevention and ... Released: July 27, 2011
    In order to help reduce the obesity burden on the American population, behavioral scientists have emphasized building an evidence base for understanding what drives the energy imbalance in overweight and obese individuals. Food scientists have tapped into this evidence to develop food technologies that can increase the healthfulness of the food supply by reducing energy density, increasing fruit and vegetable intake, and controlling food portion sizes. The IOM held a workshop November 2-3, 2010, to bring together stakeholders to discuss the opportunities and challenges in using food technology to help individuals with long-term weight maintenance.