About Publications

Publications from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes Health and Medicine Division (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Neuroforensics: Exploring the Legal Implications of Emerging ... Released: July 06, 2018
    On March 6, 2018, the Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders, in collaboration with the Committee on Science, Technology, and Law (CSTL), held a public workshop to explore and advance efforts to identify and evaluate the potential effects of emerging neurotechnologies on the legal system.
  • Urbanization and Slums: Infectious Diseases in the Built ... Released: June 08, 2018
    On December 12-13, the Forum on Microbial Threats, in collaboration with the Board on Life Sciences hosted a workshop examining "Urbanization and Slums: New Transmission Pathways of Infectious Diseases in the Built Environment."
  • Financing and Payment Strategies to Support High-Quality ... Released: May 16, 2018
    Those facing serious illness have a range of interconnected medical and non-medical needs, and the way their care is financed has a large impact on the care they receive. Medicare is the predominant payer, but both Medicaid and private payers also play significant roles in financing care for serious illness. In an effort to address the complex needs of people with serious illness, public and private health care payers are testing innovative financing strategies and alternative payment models.
  • Advancing Therapeutic Development for Pain and Opioid Use ... Released: March 23, 2018
    Chronic pain is one of the most prevalent, costly, and disabling health conditions in the United States. In parallel with increasing recognition of the need to treat chronic pain, the opioid epidemic has emerged as a growing public health emergency. In 2017, the National Institutes of Health began exploring public-private partnerships to develop solutions to the opioid crisis and cut in half the time it takes to develop non-addictive analgesics. To help inform this effort, the National Academies’ Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous Systems Disorders hosted a public workshop that brought together experts and stakeholders from academia, federal agencies, advocacy organizations, and companies developing therapeutics for pain and opioid use disorders.
  • Enabling Novel Treatments for Nervous System Disorders by ... Released: March 08, 2018
    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) presents a special challenge to the development of therapeutics for many central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Far from acting simply as a physical barrier, the BBB is a complex dynamic system involving several cell types, passive and active transport mechanisms, and adaptive function to control the exchange of substances between the blood and the CNS. Few therapeutic agents readily traverse the BBB to reach the brain or spinal cord, including most small molecule drugs and the vast majority of large molecules such as proteins.
  • Combating Antimicrobial Resistance: A One Health Approach ... Released: December 08, 2017
    To build on previous work, to explore developments since the last workshop was convened, and to help parlay knowledge into immediate action, an ad hoc planning committee, under the auspices of the Forum of Microbial Threats at the National Academies, planned a 2-day public workshop Combating Antimicrobial Resistance: A One Health Approach to a Global Threat. The workshop explored issues of antimicrobial resistance through the lens of One Health, which is a collaborative approach of multiple disciplines—working locally, nationally, and globally—for strengthening systems to counter infectious diseases and related issues that threaten human, animal, and environmental health, with an end point of improving global health and achieving gains in development.
  • Making Medicines Affordable: A National Imperative : Health ... Released: November 30, 2017
    Over the past several decades, the biopharmaceutical sector in the United States has been successful in developing and delivering effective drugs for improving health and fighting disease, and many medical conditions that were long deemed untreatable can now be cured or managed effectively. At the same time, spending on prescription drugs has been rising dramatically, to the point that many individuals have difficulty paying for the drugs that they or their family members need.
  • Exploring the Translation of the Results of Hurricane Sandy ... Released: September 15, 2017
    The workshop Translating the Results of Hurricane Sandy Research Grants into Policy and Operations was convened on July 20, 2017, in Washington, DC, by the Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine with the objective of exploring key findings from published Hurricane Sandy research grant projects, examining the impact of the scientific findings on disaster policy and operations, and discussing opportunities to translate the research findings to future preparedness response and recovery efforts.
  • Biomarkers of Neuroinflammation: Proceedings of a Workshop ... Released: September 15, 2017
    Innate and adaptive immunity have become very important areas of investigation for psychiatric, neurologic, and neurodevelopmental disorders, and neurodegeneration resulting from traumatic brain injury. To address these gaps in understanding mechanisms and how to translate that understanding into therapeutics, the Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop on March 20–21, 2017, bringing together key leaders in the field from industry, academia, and governmental agencies to explore the role and mechanisms of neuroinflammation in a variety of central nervous system diseases.
  • Guiding Principles for Developing Dietary Reference Intakes ... Released: August 03, 2017
    For decades, nutrient intake recommendations have been issued through the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) established by consensus committees of the Institute of Medicine, and now the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (the National Academies). For each nutrient (e.g., vitamins, minerals, water, electrolytes, carbohydrate, or protein) deemed essential, DRI committees reviews the scientific literature to help inform nutrition standards of adequacy and toxicity for groups of people of different genders and at different life stages. These DRIs are used for planning and assessing the diets of apparently healthy individuals and groups.