About Publications

Publications from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes Health and Medicine Division (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Using Technology to Advance Global Health: Proceedings of ... Released: November 17, 2017
    Applications of digital health are being used to reduce inefficiencies, improve access, reduce costs, increase quality, and personalize care. However, despite the growth of the digital health sector, communities in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) often miss out on the benefits of digital health’s potential.
  • Facilitating Health Communication with Immigrant, Refugee ... Released: November 13, 2017
    The increasingly diverse ethnic composition of the United States population has created a profound and ongoing demographic shift, and public health and health care organizations face many challenges as they move to address and adapt to this change. To better understand how the public health and health care communities can meet the challenges of serving an increasingly diverse population, the Roundtable on Health Literacy created an ad hoc committee to plan and conduct a public workshop on facilitating health communication with immigrant, refugee, and migrant populations through the use of health literate approaches.
  • Models and Strategies to Integrate Palliative Care Principles ... Released: October 24, 2017
    The Roundtable on Quality Care for People with Serious Illness hosted a full-day workshop on April 27, 2017 to explore Models and Strategies to Integrate Palliative Care Principles into Care for People with Serious Illness. The workshop aimed to highlight innovative models of community-based care for people of all ages facing serious illness.
  • Communicating Clearly About Medicines: Proceedings of a ... Released: September 08, 2017
    The Roundtable on Health Literacy of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop on communicating clearly about medicines. The workshop focused on the clarity of written information given to patients and consumers as printed or digital materials. The workshop was organized around presentations and panel discussions that explored the design of health-literate written materials and examples that illustrated implementation of research into the development of these materials. The workshop rapporteurs in brief have prepared this proceedings as a factual summation of the session discussions.
  • The Drug Development Paradigm in Oncology: Proceedings ... Released: July 24, 2017
    Advances in cancer research have led to an improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning the development of cancer and how the immune system responds to cancer. This influx of research has led to an increasing number and variety of cancer therapies in the drug development pipeline. Compared with standard chemotherapies, these new cancer therapies may demonstrate evidence of benefit at an earlier stage of development.
  • Integrating the Patient and Caregiver Voice into Serious ... Released: July 14, 2017
    Millions of people—infants, children, adults, and their families—are currently coping with serious illness in the United States. Efforts are intensifying to improve overall care quality through the delivery of person-centered and family-oriented services, for patients of all ages and across disease stages, care settings, and specialties. While aging Baby Boomers are increasing the proportion of patients in the Medicare population over time, the sickest and most vulnerable patients needing health system support and other services to meet their complex needs can be found across the age spectrum and in a broad range of care settings, from perinatal care to geriatric care.
  • Engaging the Private Sector and Developing Partnerships to ... Released: June 27, 2017
    In September 2016, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were adopted at the United Nations (UN) Development Summit to serve as a 15-year plan of action for all countries and people. Since the announcement of the SDGs, countries have been mapping out their national action plans, updating health and development information, reviewing national priorities, assessing the focus of current international development assistance, and determining which policies, laws, and strategies are already aligned with SDG targets and what changes are needed. In this process, many public and private entities are identifying opportunities for greater alignment and effectiveness in reaching their goals through partnerships. Considering this context, the Forum on Public–Private Partnerships for Global Health and Safety (PPP Forum) convened a workshop series to examine opportunities for the private sector to engage in partnerships to advance health and the SDGs.
  • Health Communication with Immigrants, Refugees, and ... Released: June 02, 2017
    The Roundtable on Health Literacy of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop focused on facilitating health communication with people from immigrant, refugee, and migrant worker populations.
  • Cancer Care in Low-Resource Areas: Cancer Treatment ... Released: May 23, 2017
    Though cancer was once considered to be a problem primarily in wealthy nations, low- and middle-income countries now bear a majority share of the global cancer burden. Disparities in cancer outcomes also exist in high-income countries—communities within wealthier nations can experience worse cancer outcomes, especially if they have challenges in accessing cancer prevention and cancer care services.
  • Developing Affordable and Accessible Community-Based ... Released: May 17, 2017
    Accessible and affordable housing can enable community living, maximize independence, and promote health for vulnerable populations. However, the United States faces a shortage of affordable and accessible housing for vulnerable low-income older adults and individuals living with disabilities. This shortage is expected to grow over the coming years given the population shifts leading to greater numbers of older adults and of individuals living with disabilities.