About Publications

Publications from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes Health and Medicine Division (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Understanding the Economics of Microbial Threats : Health ... Released: October 15, 2018
    On June 11-12, 2018, the Forum on Microbial Threats at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine organized a 1.5-day public workshop to assess the current understanding of the interaction of infectious disease threats with economic activity and suggest new areas of research. This workshop built on prior work of the Forum and aimed to build more mutual understanding between those in the economic world and those with public health and clinical experience. Through multisectoral participation, topics in the workshop identified potential knowledge gaps, research priorities for further exploration, and strategies to advance the field in understanding the econom¬ics of microbial threats.
  • Medical Product Shortages During Disasters: Opportunities to ... Released: September 28, 2018
    The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop to better understand the gaps that led to cascading effects in patient care throughout the U.S. health care system. On September 5–6, 2018, in Washington, DC, the Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies convened the workshop Medical Product Shortages During Disasters: Opportunities to Predict, Prevent, and Respond.
  • Urbanization and Slums: Infectious Diseases in the Built ... Released: June 08, 2018
    On December 12-13, the Forum on Microbial Threats, in collaboration with the Board on Life Sciences hosted a workshop examining "Urbanization and Slums: New Transmission Pathways of Infectious Diseases in the Built Environment."
  • Combating Antimicrobial Resistance: A One Health Approach ... Released: December 08, 2017
    To build on previous work, to explore developments since the last workshop was convened, and to help parlay knowledge into immediate action, an ad hoc planning committee, under the auspices of the Forum of Microbial Threats at the National Academies, planned a 2-day public workshop Combating Antimicrobial Resistance: A One Health Approach to a Global Threat. The workshop explored issues of antimicrobial resistance through the lens of One Health, which is a collaborative approach of multiple disciplines—working locally, nationally, and globally—for strengthening systems to counter infectious diseases and related issues that threaten human, animal, and environmental health, with an end point of improving global health and achieving gains in development.
  • Exploring the Translation of the Results of Hurricane Sandy ... Released: September 15, 2017
    The workshop Translating the Results of Hurricane Sandy Research Grants into Policy and Operations was convened on July 20, 2017, in Washington, DC, by the Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine with the objective of exploring key findings from published Hurricane Sandy research grant projects, examining the impact of the scientific findings on disaster policy and operations, and discussing opportunities to translate the research findings to future preparedness response and recovery efforts.
  • Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious ... Released: June 16, 2017
    Building communication capacity is a critical piece of preparing for, detecting, and responding to infectious disease threats. Various organizations, including CDC (2011) and WHO (2008), have provided guidance on developing frameworks, standards, protocols, and conceptual approaches to communicating critical information during infectious disease outbreaks. Furthermore, governments and nongovernmental organizations have developed and implemented plans to address the gaps in communication capacity during these situations.
  • Global Health and the Future Role of the United States ... Released: May 15, 2017
    The United States has long been a leader in global health. Yet resources are not unlimited, and the case for continued commitment must be made. With support from a broad array of federal agencies, foundations, and private partners, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened an ad hoc committee to identify global health priorities in light of current and emerging global health threats and challenges.
  • Integrating Clinical Research into Epidemic Response: The ... Released: April 12, 2017
    The 2014 Ebola epidemic in western Africa was the longest and deadliest Ebola outbreak in history, resulting in 28,616 cases and 11,310 deaths. In the midst of the rapidly spreading, highly dangerous contagious disease—with no Ebola-specific vaccines or therapeutics available to help curb the epidemic—the international community implemented clinical trials on investigational agents, not yet studied in humans for safety or efficacy.
  • Big Data and Analytics for Infectious Disease Research ... Released: December 08, 2016
    With the amount of data in the world exploding, big data could generate significant value in the field of infectious disease. The Forum on Microbial Threats determined that the broader applications and implications of big data in these areas ought to be explored, where “big data” refers to any voluminous amount of structured, semi-structured, and unstructured data that has the potential to be mined for insights and information.
  • The Ebola Epidemic in West Africa: Proceedings of a ... Released: December 06, 2016
    The most recent Ebola epidemic that began in late 2013 alerted the entire world to the gaps in infectious disease emergency preparedness and response. Building on previous outbreak workshops, the Forum on Microbial Threats convened this workshop to understand the recent developments in incidence, prevalence, and intervention strategies used to mitigate the disease in an increasingly interconnected world. Recognizing the opportunity to learn from the countless lessons of this epidemic, this workshop discussed the challenges to successful outbreak responses at the scientific, clinical, and global health levels.