About Publications

Publications from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes Health and Medicine Division (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Cognitive Aging: Progress in Understanding and ... Released: April 14, 2015
    At this point in time, when the older population is rapidly growing in the United States and across the globe, it is important to carefully examine what is known about cognitive aging, to identify the positive steps that can be taken to promote cognitive health, and then to take action to implement those changes by informing and activating the public, the health sector, nonprofit and professional associations, communities, the private sector, and government agencies. This Institute of Medicine (IOM) study examines cognitive aging, a natural process associated with advancing years. The IOM committee was charged with assessing the public health dimensions of cognitive aging with an emphasis on definitions and terminology, epidemiology and surveillance, prevention and intervention, education of health professionals, and public awareness and education.
  • The Future of Home Health Care: Workshop Summary : Health ... Released: March 18, 2015
    The 2-day public workshop brought together a spectrum of public and private stakeholders and thought leaders to improve understanding of the role of home health care (especially Medicare home health care) in supporting aging in place and in helping high-risk, chronically ill, and disabled Americans receive health care and other needed supports and services in their homes; the evolving role of home health care, including how to integrate home health care into new models for the delivery of care and the future health care marketplace; the key policy reforms and investments in workforces, technologies, and research needed to leverage the role of home health care; and research priorities that can help clarify the value of home health care.
  • The Neuroscience of Gaming: Workshop in Brief : Health and ... Released: February 02, 2015
    More than 1.2 billion people worldwide play video games (online, via console, mobile phone, and other wireless devices), and many may be unaware that programmers often incorporate neuroscience into game design. Given the high prevalence of gaming in today’s society, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders hosted the Social Issues Roundtable at the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting on November 16, 2014, in Washington, DC, to explore the neuroscience of video games, with emphasis on relevant scientific, ethical,and societal issues.
  • Advancing Therapeutic Development for Dry Age-Related ... Released: January 02, 2015
    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness among white Americans and others of European descent, with lower prevalence among those of Asian, Latino, or African ancestry. The overall prevalence of AMD is approximately 8.7 percent worldwide and is expected to rise to 196 million people worldwide by 2020 and 288 million by 2040 (Wong et al., 2014). AMD typically affects people age 50 and older, and the prevalence increases with age, particularly after the age of 75.
  • Dying in America: Improving Quality and Honoring Individual ... Released: September 17, 2014
    A substantial body of evidence shows that broad improvements to end-of-life care are within reach. In Dying in America, a consensus report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM), a committee of experts finds that improving the quality and availability of medical and social services for patients and their families could not only enhance quality of life through the end of life, but may also contribute to a more sustainable care system.
  • Dying in America: Improving Quality and Honoring Individual ... Released: September 17, 2014
    A substantial body of evidence shows that broad improvements to end-of-life care are within reach. In Dying in America, a consensus report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM), a committee of experts finds that improving the quality and availability of medical and social services for patients and their families could not only enhance quality of life through the end of life, but may also contribute to a more sustainable care system.
  • Improving Access to Essential Medicines for Mental ... Released: July 14, 2014
    Recognizing the limitations of most SSA countries to effectively treat MNS disorders, the Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders of the Institute of Medicine convened a workshop in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in January 2014. The workshop brought together key stakeholders to discuss opportunities for achieving long-term affordable access to medicines for MNS disorders and to consider frameworks and strategies that have been successful in other countries and for different diseases. In particular, the workshop was organized around a series of focused discussions on four challenge areas: insufficient demand, inappropriate selection, ineffective supply chains, and high pricing and poor financing. This document summarizes the workshop.
  • Hearing Loss and Healthy Aging - Workshop Summary ... Released: May 16, 2014
    Despite the critical importance of communication, many older adults have hearing loss that interferes with their social interactions and enjoyment of life. People may miss words in a conversation, go to fewer public places, or worry about missing an alarm. Despite rapidly advancing technologies and innovative approaches to hearing health care, fewer than one in seven older Americans with hearing loss use hearing aids. In January 2014, the IOM and National Research Council held a workshop to examine the ways in which age-related hearing loss affects healthy aging, and how public and private stakeholders can work together to address hearing loss in older adults as a public health issue.
  • Improving and Accelerating Therapeutic Development for ... Released: November 25, 2013
    Although there is a high burden associated with nervous system disorders, development of new therapeutics remains stagnant. Over the last decade, fewer new drugs for nervous system disorders have garnered approval in comparison to other therapeutic areas. Current data suggest that drug development, from the start of a discovery program to regulatory approval, can take an average of 12 to 15 years. Building off of concepts discussed at a 2012 IOM workshop, the IOM Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders held a workshop to examine opportunities to accelerate early phases of drug development for nervous system drug discovery.
  • Financing Long-Term Services and Supports for Individuals ... Released: October 22, 2013
    At least 11 million adults with disabilities, limitations, and functional impairments in the United States receive long-term services and supports – such as assistance with eating, bathing, and dressing – in order to live independently. The financing of long-term services and supports has become a major issue in the United States. With the projected aging of the U.S. population, the number of individuals needing long-term services and supports is expected to increase substantially. Given the magnitude of the challenged posed by the financing of long-term services and supports, the IOM and National Research Council held a workshop in an effort to foster dialogue and confront issues of mutual interest and concern.