About Publications

Publications from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes Health and Medicine Division (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Assessing the Impact of Applications of Digital Health Records ... Released: December 08, 2015
    On July 20, 2015, the IOM’s Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders held a public session at the 2015 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Washington, DC, to assess the impact of DHRs on Alzheimer’s disease research. “AD is the most common cause of dementia in older adults.” An estimated 46.8 million people worldwide are currently living with dementia, and the prevalence is expected to double every year for the next 20 years. Given the few therapies currently available to treat the symptoms of AD, compared to other central nervous system disorders, this session explored how DHRs may be used to help improve clinical trial design and methodology for AD research.
  • Providing Sustainable Mental and Neurological Health Care ... Released: October 01, 2015
    Mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS) disorders are the leading cause of disability and the 10th leading cause of death worldwide. Despite this high burden, there is a significant shortage of resources available to prevent, diagnose, and treat these disorders. Approximately four out of five people with serious MNS disorders living in low- and middle-income countries do not receive needed health services, with Sub-Saharan Africa having one of the largest treatment gaps.
  • Non-Invasive Neuromodulation of the Central Nervous System ... Released: July 27, 2015
    Given the growing interest in non-invasive neuromodulation technologies, the Institute of Medicine’s Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders convened a workshop, inviting a range of stakeholders—including developers of devices and new technologies, researchers, clinicians, ethicists, regulators, and payers—to explore the opportunities, challenges, and ethical questions surrounding the development, regulation, and reimbursement of these devices for the treatment of nervous system disorders as well as for non-therapeutic uses, including cognitive and functional enhancement.
  • Enabling Discovery, Development, and Translation of ... Released: July 22, 2015
    On February 24, 2015, the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM’s) Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous Disorders convened key stakeholders at a workshop in Washington, DC, to explore how best to enable the discovery, development, and translation of treatments for cognitive dysfunction in depression, including a focus on the regulatory path forward.
  • Financial Incentives to Encourage Development of Therapies ... Released: July 06, 2015
    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders, in collaboration with the IOM Forum on Drug Discovery, Development, and Translation, convened a workshop on January 20–21, 2015, to explore policy changes that might increase private sector investment in research and development (R&D) innovation that fills unmet medical needs for CNS disorders.
  • Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce ... Released: April 21, 2015
    Given the changing landscape resulting from technological advances and the growing importance of interdisciplinary and collaborative science, the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM’s) Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders convened a workshop on October 28 and 29, 2014, in Washington, DC, to explore future workforce needs and how these needs should inform training programs.
  • Cognitive Aging: Progress in Understanding and ... Released: April 14, 2015
    At this point in time, when the older population is rapidly growing in the United States and across the globe, it is important to carefully examine what is known about cognitive aging, to identify the positive steps that can be taken to promote cognitive health, and then to take action to implement those changes by informing and activating the public, the health sector, nonprofit and professional associations, communities, the private sector, and government agencies. This Institute of Medicine (IOM) study examines cognitive aging, a natural process associated with advancing years. The IOM committee was charged with assessing the public health dimensions of cognitive aging with an emphasis on definitions and terminology, epidemiology and surveillance, prevention and intervention, education of health professionals, and public awareness and education.
  • The Future of Home Health Care: Workshop Summary : Health ... Released: March 18, 2015
    The 2-day public workshop brought together a spectrum of public and private stakeholders and thought leaders to improve understanding of the role of home health care (especially Medicare home health care) in supporting aging in place and in helping high-risk, chronically ill, and disabled Americans receive health care and other needed supports and services in their homes; the evolving role of home health care, including how to integrate home health care into new models for the delivery of care and the future health care marketplace; the key policy reforms and investments in workforces, technologies, and research needed to leverage the role of home health care; and research priorities that can help clarify the value of home health care.
  • The Neuroscience of Gaming: Workshop in Brief : Health and ... Released: February 02, 2015
    More than 1.2 billion people worldwide play video games (online, via console, mobile phone, and other wireless devices), and many may be unaware that programmers often incorporate neuroscience into game design. Given the high prevalence of gaming in today’s society, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders hosted the Social Issues Roundtable at the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting on November 16, 2014, in Washington, DC, to explore the neuroscience of video games, with emphasis on relevant scientific, ethical,and societal issues.
  • Advancing Therapeutic Development for Dry Age-Related ... Released: January 02, 2015
    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness among white Americans and others of European descent, with lower prevalence among those of Asian, Latino, or African ancestry. The overall prevalence of AMD is approximately 8.7 percent worldwide and is expected to rise to 196 million people worldwide by 2020 and 288 million by 2040 (Wong et al., 2014). AMD typically affects people age 50 and older, and the prevalence increases with age, particularly after the age of 75.