About Publications

Publications from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes Health and Medicine Division (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • The Nation's Medical Countermeasure Stockpile ... Released: June 28, 2016
    The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine established a standing committee of experts to help inform decision making by CDC DSNS, including experts in state and local public health, medical countermeasure (MCM) production, warehouse and product distribution, logistics management, pharmaceutical supply chain modeling, emergency medical services, emergency medicine, risk communications, and FDA regulatory issues.
  • A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and ... Released: June 17, 2016
    A National Trauma Care System: Integrating Military and Civilian Trauma Systems to Achieve Zero Preventable Deaths After Injury, presents a vision for a national trauma care system driven by the clear and bold aim of zero preventable deaths after injury and minimal trauma-related disability to benefit those the nation sends into harm’s way in combat as well as every American.
  • Establishing an African Association for Health Professions ... Released: April 19, 2016
    Africa faces a severe shortage of human resources for health. Over the past 5 years, the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, in partnership with the National Institutes of Health, has sought to address this problem by supporting health professional education and research in Africa through the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) and the Nursing Education Partnership Initiative (NEPI).
  • Cancer Care in Low-Resource Areas: Cancer Prevention and ... Released: March 10, 2016
    Effective low-cost cancer control options are available for some malignancies, but these interventions remain inaccessible for many people in the world, especially those residing in low-resource communities. Disparities in cancer outcomes can also be found in high-income countries—communities within wealthier nations especially if they have challenges accessing cancer prevention and cancer care services.
  • Policy and Research Needs to Maximize Independence and ... Released: March 04, 2016
    Living independently and participating in one’s community are priorities for many people. In many regions across the United States, there are programs that support and enable people with disabilities and older adults to live in the setting of their choosing and to participate fully in their communities.
  • Appropriate Use of Advanced Technologies for Radiation ... Released: December 23, 2015
    In recent years, the field of oncology has witnessed a number of technological advances, including more precise radiation therapy and minimally invasive surgical techniques. The increased cost of these novel treatments without adequate assessment of how they affect patient outcomes is a pressing concern given that inappropriate use of expensive technologies is one of the key factors that threaten the affordability of cancer care in the United States.
  • Assessing Progress on the IOM Report The Future of Nursing ... Released: December 04, 2015
    In 2010, The Institute of Medicine (IOM) released the report The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, which made a series of recommendations pertaining to the roles for nurses in the new health care landscape. Shortly after release of The Future of Nursing report, AARP and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation launched the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action to shepherd The Future of Nursing report’s recommendations. In 2014, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation asked the IOM to convene a committee to assess progress made on implementing The Future of Nursing report recommendations and identify areas that should be emphasized over the next 5 years.
  • The Role of Clinical Studies for Pets with Naturally Occurring ... Released: October 30, 2015
    Recently, there has been renewed interest in comparative oncology— the study of naturally developing cancers in animals as models for human disease—as one way to improve cancer drug development and reduce attrition of investigational agents. Tumors that spontaneously develop in pet dogs and other companion animals as a result of normal aging share many characteristics with human cancers, such as histological appearance, tumor genetics, biological behavior, molecular targets, and therapeutic response.
  • Opportunities to Promote Children's Behavioral Health: Health ... Released: October 07, 2015
    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) has several provisions that could greatly improve the behavioral health of children and adolescents in the United States. To explore how the ACA and other aspects of health care reform can support innovations to improve children’s behavioral health and sustain those innovations over time, the Forum on Promoting Children’s Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health held a workshop in Washington, DC, on April 1–2, 2015, titled “Opportunities to Promote Children’s Behavioral Health: Health Care Reform and Beyond.”
  • Assessing and Improving the Interpretation of Breast Images ... Released: September 24, 2015
    Since 2005, a substantial new body of research pertaining to mammography interpretation has been published. To explore this evidence and its policy implications, the IOM’s National Cancer Policy Forum, with support from the American Cancer Society (ACS), brought together experts and members of the public for the workshop, “Assessing and Improving the Interpretation of Breast Images,” which was held on May 12 and 13, 2015, in Washington, DC. At this workshop, clinicians and researchers, along with representatives from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), National Cancer Institute (NCI), and patient advocacy organizations, discussed potential options for action to improve the quality of mammography interpretation.