About Publications

Publications from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes Health and Medicine Division (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • The Nation's Medical Countermeasure Stockpile ... Released: June 28, 2016
    The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine established a standing committee of experts to help inform decision making by CDC DSNS, including experts in state and local public health, medical countermeasure (MCM) production, warehouse and product distribution, logistics management, pharmaceutical supply chain modeling, emergency medical services, emergency medicine, risk communications, and FDA regulatory issues.
  • Assessing Prevalence and Trends in Obesity: Navigating the ... Released: June 21, 2016
    Accurate and meaningful estimates of prevalence and trends are fundamental to describing and understanding the scope of obesity. Policy makers, program planners, and other stakeholders search for and use reports relevant to their population(s) of interest to inform decision making. Interpreting and appropriately applying information derived from such reports, however, is challenging because of variations in methodologies and presentation that exist in the literature. In the report, Assessing Prevalence and Trends in Obesity: Navigating the Evidence, the committee offers a description of the landscape of the literature, a framework for assessing and interpreting published reports, and recommendations for improving future data collection efforts and filling data gaps.
  • Relevance of Health Literacy to Precision Medicine ... Released: June 08, 2016
    On March 2, 2016, the Roundtable on Health Literacy of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop to examine the relevance of health literacy to precision medicine, a growing field that takes into account individuals’ differences in genes, environments, and lifestyles. The workshop explored the intersection of health literacy and precision medicine through a number of topics, but its impetus was the Precision Medicine Initiative.
  • Obesity in the Early Childhood Years: State of the Science and ... Released: June 01, 2016
    To explore what is known about effective and innovative interventions to counter obesity in young children, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Roundtable on Obesity Solutions held a workshop in Washington, DC, on October 6, 2015, titled Obesity in the Early Childhood Years: Emerging Science and Implemen­tation of Promising Solutions. The workshop brought together leaders from many sectors to describe the science of early childhood obesity, from its prevalence and trends to the influence of epigenetics and sleep.  Speakers and participants also explored risk factors for children, effective cross-sector solutions, and opportunities for interventions in the many settings where children live, learn, and play. This summary describes what was discussed at the workshop.
  • Health Literacy and Palliative Care: Workshop Summary ... Released: May 20, 2016
    To explore the relationship between palliative care and health literacy, and the importance of health literate communication in providing high-quality delivery of palliative care, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Roundtable on Health Literacy convened this 1-day public workshop featuring presentations and discussions that exam­ined the effect of low health literacy on all aspects of palliative care.
  • Applying an Implementation Science Approach to Genomic ... Released: April 28, 2016
    Recognizing the current challenges that may impede the integration of genomics into clinical practice, the Roundtable on Translating Genomic-Based Research for Health (now called the Roundtable on Genomics and Precision Health) hosted a workshop on November 19, 2015 to explore the methods and approaches of implementation science for their potential ability to improve the integration of genomics into medicine.
  • Advancing the Discipline of Regulatory Science for Medical ... Released: April 20, 2016
    The field of endeavors known as "regulatory science" has grown out of the need to link and integrate knowledge within and among basic science research, clinical medicine, and other specific scientific disciplines whose focus, aggregation, and ultimate implementation could inform biomedical product development and regulatory decision making. On October 20–21, 2015, the Forum on Drug Discovery, Development, and Translation held a public workshop to facilitate dialogue among stakeholders about the current state and scope of regulatory sciences, opportunities to address barriers to the discipline's success, and avenues for fostering collaboration across sectors. This report is a summary of the workshop.
  • Eliminating the Public Health Problem of Hepatitis B and C in ... Released: April 11, 2016
    Viral hepatitis is the seventh leading cause of death in the world, killing more people than road traffic injuries, HIV and AIDS, or diabetes. Every year chronic viral hepatitis, of which hepatitis B and C are the most common forms, kills a million people, roughly 20,000 of them in the United States. These deaths could be prevented. Hepatitis B vaccine conveys 95 percent immunity, and new therapies for hepatitis C cure the vast majority of patients.
  • Global Health Impacts of Vector-Borne Diseases: Workshop ... Released: April 05, 2016
    Pathogens transmitted among humans, animals, or plants by insects and arthropod vectors have been responsible for significant morbidity and mortality throughout recorded history. Such vector-borne diseases—including malaria, dengue, yellow fever, plague, trypanosomiasis, and leishmaniasis—together accounted for more human disease and death in the 17th through early 20th centuries than all other causes combined. Domestic and international capabilities to detect, identify, and effectively respond to vector-borne diseases are limited.
  • Metrics That Matter for Population Health Action: Workshop ... Released: March 08, 2016
    David Kindig, Professor Emeritus and Emeritus Vice-Chancellor, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, said not only is there an overabundance of measures and indicators available for measuring various aspects of population health, but there have been multiple efforts to examine the nature, validity, uses, and usefulness of existing measures with the goal of simplifying existing sets to meet the needs of all decision makers, from policymakers to communities, without much success in meeting that goal.