About Publications

Publications from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes Health and Medicine Division (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Nutrition Across the Lifespan for Healthy Aging: Proceedings ... Released: May 18, 2017
    More than 46 million people over the age of 65 years were living in the United States in 2014 and more than 70 million are predicted by 2060. Education, living arrangements, and other demographic characteristics of this older population are changing, with noted variability by sex and race/ethnicity. Health status indicators, including life expectancy and heart disease death rates, have shown improvement, as have economic indicators.
  • Developing Affordable and Accessible Community-Based ... Released: May 17, 2017
    Accessible and affordable housing can enable community living, maximize independence, and promote health for vulnerable populations. However, the United States faces a shortage of affordable and accessible housing for vulnerable low-income older adults and individuals living with disabilities. This shortage is expected to grow over the coming years given the population shifts leading to greater numbers of older adults and of individuals living with disabilities.
  • Communicating Clearly About Medicines: Proceedings of a ... Released: May 16, 2017
    The Roundtable on Health Literacy of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop on communicating clearly about medicines. The workshop focused on the clarity of written information given to patients and consumers as printed or digital materials. The workshop was organized around presentations and panel discussions that explored the design of health-literate written materials and examples that illustrated implementation of research into the development of these materials. The workshop rapporteurs in brief have prepared this proceedings as a factual summation of the session discussions.
  • Global Health and the Future Role of the United States ... Released: May 15, 2017
    The United States has long been a leader in global health. Yet resources are not unlimited, and the case for continued commitment must be made. With support from a broad array of federal agencies, foundations, and private partners, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened an ad hoc committee to identify global health priorities in light of current and emerging global health threats and challenges.
  • Training the Future Child Health Care Workforce to Improve ... Released: May 12, 2017
    Childhood diagnoses of cognitive, affective, and behavioral disorders are increasing in both absolute numbers and as a proportion of the total childhood population in the United States, and they are imposing a large and growing burden on children, youth, and families. However, the adoption of evidence-based interventions that have proven effective in preventing and treating behavioral health disorders in children has been slow. A contributing factor for this slow adoption may be that current training in many fields involving the behavioral health of children is falling short of meeting needs.
  • The Promise of Assistive Technology to Enhance Activity and ... Released: May 09, 2017
    In 2012, the Government Accountability Office recommended that SSA examine “the availability and effects of considering more fully assistive devices and workplace accommodations in its disability determinations.” In this context, SSA asked the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to convene an ad hoc, expert committee to provide an analysis of the use in adults of selected assistive products and technologies, within four categories including, wheeled and seated mobility devices, upper-extremity prostheses, hearing devices, and finally, communication and speech technologies.
  • Implementing Evidence-Based Prevention by Communities to ... Released: April 14, 2017
    Given the importance of communities in shaping the health and well-being of young people, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine held a workshop in June 2016, to examine the implementation of evidence-based prevention by communities. The workshop brought together researchers, program developers and implementers, state and local of officials, community leaders, health care providers, patient advocates, and other stakeholders to examine how knowledge from researchers and practitioners can best be implemented in community settings. This publication briefly summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.
  • Integrating Clinical Research into Epidemic Response: The ... Released: April 12, 2017
    The 2014 Ebola epidemic in western Africa was the longest and deadliest Ebola outbreak in history, resulting in 28,616 cases and 11,310 deaths. In the midst of the rapidly spreading, highly dangerous contagious disease—with no Ebola-specific vaccines or therapeutics available to help curb the epidemic—the international community implemented clinical trials on investigational agents, not yet studied in humans for safety or efficacy.
  • Future Financial Economics of Health Professional Education ... Released: April 05, 2017
    The Government Accountability Office (GAO), World Health Organization (WHO), and the World Bank all agree that “an adequate, well-trained, and diverse health [care] workforce is essential for providing access to quality health [care] services.” However, according to the World Bank, efforts to scale up the supply of health workers are falling short. The resulting health workforce shortage affects people’s access to quality health care around the globe, and can result in untreated sickness, disability, and adverse economic consequences.
  • A National Strategy for the Elimination of Hepatitis B and C ... Released: March 28, 2017
    Each year, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus cause nearly 1.5 million deaths worldwide—more than HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria. Such loss of life comes at a cost to society through the direct expense of treatment as well as through the loss of adults in their prime. In an effort to describe a strategy for eliminating viral hepatitis as a U.S. public health problem by 2030, the National Academies, with support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and the National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable, convened an expert committee to outline a national strategy.