About Publications

Publications from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes Health and Medicine Division (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Harvesting the Scientific Investment in Prevention Science to ... Released: April 01, 2015
    With more than 200 prevention-centered, evidence-based health interventions in their toolbox, pediatric health practitioners stand to reap a bounty of benefits for their clients and communities. But how should all these data be harvested and evaluated, particularly in light of the changes introduced by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008, as well as reduced funding, implementation barriers, and the demands of balancing public health against individual patient treatment choices?
  • Strategies for Scaling Tested and Effective Family-Focused ... Released: April 01, 2015
    On April 1–2, 2014, the Board on Children, Youth, and Families of the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council held a 2-day workshop titled “Strategies for Scaling Tested and Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children’s Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health.” The purpose of the workshop was to discuss the successes and challenges of scaling family-focused interventions.
  • Innovations in Design and Utilization of Measurement ... Released: March 31, 2015
    The workshop featured presentations on the use of data linkage and integration to inform research and practice related to children’s cognitive, affective, and behavioral health; the use of quality measures to facilitate system change in health care, classroom, and juvenile justice settings; and tools developed to measure implementation of evidence-based prevention programs at scale to support sustainable program delivery, among other topics.
  • Informed Consent and Health Literacy: Workshop Summary ... Released: March 16, 2015
    To explore what actions can be taken to help close the gap between what is required in the informed consent process and communicating it in a health-literate and meaningful manner to individuals, the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) Roundtable on Health Literacy convened this one-day public workshop featuring presentations and discussions that examine the implications of health literacy for informed consent for both research involving human subjects and treatment of patients. The Roundtable on Health Literacy brings together leaders from academia, industry, government, foundations and associations, and representatives of patient and consumer interests who work to improve health literacy. To achieve its mission, the roundtable discusses challenges facing health-literacy practice and research, and identifies approaches to promote health literacy through mechanisms and partnerships in both the public and private sectors.
  • Review of VA Clinical Guidance for the Health Conditions ... Released: March 11, 2015
    U.S. Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune covers about 156,000 acres in eastern North Carolina, and at any given time is home to about 170,000 active-duty personnel, family members, retirees, and civilian employees who live on base or in the surrounding community. Between 1957 and 1987, the groundwater at Camp Lejeune was inadvertently contaminated with chemicals, primarily industrial solvents. Many of these chemicals were later found to cause cancer and other health problems, although not all of them were recognized as toxic at the time of contamination.
  • Beyond Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue ... Released: February 10, 2015
    The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the National Institutes of Health, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Food and Drug Administration, and the Social Security Administration asked the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to convene an expert committee to examine the evidence base for ME/CFS. In Beyond Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Redefining an Illness, the committee proposes new diagnostic criteria that will facilitate timely diagnosis and care and enhance understanding among health care providers and the public.
  • Review of NASA's Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks ... Released: January 14, 2015
    NASA’s Human Research Program developed a collection of evidence reports that provide “the current record of the state of knowledge from research and operations” for more than 30 human health and performance risks related to long-duration and exploration spaceflights. To review NASA’s evidence reports, the IOM assembled a multi-disciplinary committee with expertise in aerospace medicine, occupational health, radiation medicine, human performance, systems engineering, human-computer interaction, internal medicine, physiology and cardiovascular health, immunology, behavioral health and sociology, task simulation and training, and biomedical informatics.
  • Post-Vietnam Dioxin Exposure in Agent Orange ... Released: January 09, 2015
    The VA asked the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to evaluate whether service in ORH C-123s could have exposed AF Reservists to herbicide residues at levels harmful to their health. In Post-Vietnam Dioxin Exposure in Agent Orange–Contaminated C-123 Aircraft, an expert IOM committee performs a qualitative assessment based on the science and evidence available.
  • Facilitating Patient Understanding of Discharge Instructions ... Released: December 08, 2014
    The Roundtable on Health Literacy brings together leaders from academia, industry, government, foundations, and associations and representatives of patient and consumer interests who work to improve health literacy. To achieve its mission, the roundtable discusses challenges facing health literacy practice and research and identifies approaches to promote health literacy through mechanisms and partnerships in both the public and private sectors.
  • Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults ... Released: October 30, 2014
    Young adulthood—ages approximately 18 to 26—is a critical period of development with long-lasting implications for a person’s economic security, health, and well-being. Recognizing the need for a special focus on young adulthood, the Health Resources and Services Administration and the Office of the Assistant Sec¬retary for Planning and Evaluation in the Department of Health and Human Services, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, The Annie E. Casey Foundation, and the Department of Defense commissioned the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and National Research Council (NRC) to convene a committee of experts to review what is known about the health, safety, and well-being of young adults and to offer recommendations for policy and research.