About Publications

Publications from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes Health and Medicine Division (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Harvesting the Scientific Investment in Prevention Science to ... Released: October 29, 2014
    To reap what has been learned from such implementation, and to explore how new legislation and policies, such as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act, as well as advances in technology and analytical methods can help drive future implementation, the IOM-NRC Forum on Promoting Children’s Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health held the workshop “Harvesting the Scientific Investment in Prevention Science to Promote Children’s Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health” in Washington, DC, on June 16 and 17, 2014.
  • Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive ... Released: July 31, 2014
    The Forum on Promoting Children’s Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health convened its first workshop on Strategies for Scaling Tested and Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children’s Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health on April 1-2, 2014 in Washington, DC. The workshop featured presentations on and discussion of successes and challenges experienced by developers and implementers of family-focused preventive interventions that have been successfully brought to scale; considerations related to the implementation of preventive programs in settings—such as pediatric practices and schools—that are emerging as important points of intervention; and the role of intermediary organizations in scale-up, among other topics. This document summarizes the workshop.
  • Improving Access to Essential Medicines for Mental ... Released: July 14, 2014
    Recognizing the limitations of most SSA countries to effectively treat MNS disorders, the Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders of the Institute of Medicine convened a workshop in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in January 2014. The workshop brought together key stakeholders to discuss opportunities for achieving long-term affordable access to medicines for MNS disorders and to consider frameworks and strategies that have been successful in other countries and for different diseases. In particular, the workshop was organized around a series of focused discussions on four challenge areas: insufficient demand, inappropriate selection, ineffective supply chains, and high pricing and poor financing. This document summarizes the workshop.
  • Treatment for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Military and ... Released: June 20, 2014
    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is one of the signature injuries of the U.S. conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. An estimated 8 percent of current and former service members deployed to these areas have a PTSD diagnosis. For these men and women, readjustment from combat zone deployments and reintegra¬tion into families and communities may be significantly hampered by chronic distress and disability in physical, psychological, social, and occupational functioning. A provision of the National Defense Authorization Act for 2010 required the Secretary of the Department of Defense (DoD), in consultation with the Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), to commission an IOM study to assess PTSD treatment programs and ser¬vices in DoD and VA. The IOM report offers recommendations and guidance for improv¬ing processes and infrastructure to allow DoD and VA to respond more strategically and effectively to the increasing prevalence of PTSD among U.S. service members and veterans.
  • Improving and Accelerating Therapeutic Development for ... Released: November 25, 2013
    Although there is a high burden associated with nervous system disorders, development of new therapeutics remains stagnant. Over the last decade, fewer new drugs for nervous system disorders have garnered approval in comparison to other therapeutic areas. Current data suggest that drug development, from the start of a discovery program to regulatory approval, can take an average of 12 to 15 years. Building off of concepts discussed at a 2012 IOM workshop, the IOM Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders held a workshop to examine opportunities to accelerate early phases of drug development for nervous system drug discovery.
  • Elder Abuse and Its Prevention - Workshop Summary : Health ... Released: October 18, 2013
    Data suggests that one in 10 older adults in the United States experience physical, psychological, and sexual abuse, neglect, or financial exploitation. Elder abuse violates older adults’ fundamental rights to be safe and free from violence. With the global population of adults older than 60 expected to double to 1.2 billion by 2025, the number of older adults will exceed the number of children for the first time in history. Despite the growing magnitude of elder abuse, it has been an underappreciated public health problem. The IOM Forum on Global Violence Prevention held a workshop on elder abuse and its prevention to shed light on this underappreciated and often overlooked form of violence.
  • Neurodegeneration: Exploring Commonalities Across ... Released: October 03, 2013
    Neurodegenerative diseases – such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) – are becoming increasingly more prevalent in the United States due to the aging population. Implications of these diseases are grave, both for individual and family quality of life and for healthcare costs. Recent findings have revealed potential commonalities and parallelisms in genetic and cellular mechanisms across neurodegenerative diseases. In 2012, the IOM hosted a workshop to explore commonalities across neurodegenerative diseases and to identify potential opportunities for collaboration across the respective research and development communities.
  • A Ready and Resilient Workforce for the Department of ... Released: September 12, 2013
    Every day, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) carries out important work that contributes to the safety of the United States and furthers the formation and maintenance of a resilient nation. Created in 2002 from a merger that rapidly incorporated parts of eight cabinet departments and 22 government agencies, DHS has struggled to integrate its numerous components and their unique cultures. While it’s very accomplished at performing its missions, the nature of the DHS work environment is inherently stressful, and employees suffer from numerous organizational and morale challenges. The DHS Office of Health Affairs asked the IOM to review current workforce resilience efforts, identify gaps, and provide recommendations for a 5-year strategy to improve DHSTogether, its current workforce resilience program.
  • Strengthening Human Resources Through Development of ... Released: August 14, 2013
    Sub-Saharan Africa has one of the largest treatment gaps for mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS) disorders in the world. The ability to provide adequate human resources for the delivery of essential interventions for MNS disorders is a critical barrier to bridging the treatment gap. In 2012, the IOM hosted a second workshop in Kampala, Uganda, to discuss candidate core competencies that providers might need to help ensure the effective delivery of services for MNS disorders. The workshop focused on candidate competencies for four MNS disorders that account for the greatest burden in low- and middle-income countries: depression, psychosis, epilepsy, and alcohol use disorders.
  • Returning Home from Iraq and Afghanistan: Readjustment ... Released: March 26, 2013
    The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have been the longest sustained U.S. military operations since the Vietnam era, sending more than 2.2 million troops into battle, and resulting in more than 6,600 deaths and 48,000 injuries. While many service members return home relatively unscathed and report rewarding experiences, others return with varied complex health conditions and find that readjusting to life at home, reconnecting with family, finding work, or returning to school is an ongoing struggle. The IOM was asked to study veterans’ physical and mental health, as well as other readjustment needs. Following its phase one report, this report presents the IOM’s comprehensive assessment of the physical, psychological, social, and economic effects of deployment on service members, veterans, their families, and their communities.